Windy Weekend: Strong Nor’Easter Then Winter Fights Back

Windy Weekend: Strong Nor’Easter Then Winter Fights Back

Nor'Easter January 16This morning there is a strengthening Nor’Easter that will continue to slam parts of New York and New England into the afternoon. This is the same system that pushed out our cold air with a round of moderate to heavy rain overnight. As that spins up north, the winds will crank and we will end up with a mild and dry day.  Some snow showers building off of the Great Lakes will hit the mountains, but that is par for the course.

Now the bitter pill for snow lovers to swallow, and we can blame El Nino. There will be a second storm, but this one stays south hitting Florida. There was a tornado touchdown near Fort Meyers from a system on Friday. This next system is the same one I had showed earlier in the week as the GFS Model tried to bring it up the coast. It’s the strong southern jet stream that is pushing this storm farther east and preventing it from turning the corner up our way. However there will be some moisture that will spread north into Virginia and central Maryland. There still could be light snow or flurries Sunday afternoon. Then the really cold air follows. See more below.

Large View Storm Track- Slider –>

Sunday Snow? – Slider–>

Note where the freezing line is.  Should this model be misinterpreting rain where light snow will fall, don’t expect stickage.


Temperature Outlook:

The truly cold air will arrive Sunday night. We should stay below freezing into the first part of next week.
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